Casisano

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Località Casisano, 52
53024 Montalcino SI

Not everyone knows that Montalcino played a leading role in the history of Slow Food, the most renowned international non-profit association committed to promoting “good, clean, and fair” food. In 1982, Carlo Petrini, the future founder of Slow Food, led a group of young social activists from the Arci Langhe association in Bra. Carlo was raised with a leftist political orientation and decided that focusing on a basic human need like food would be the best way to change the world. He went to Montalcino with his comrades to taste the Brunello that was all the rage. But at the political festival, Festa dell’Unità they attended, they were presented with bad food served with Rosso di Montalcino, instead of Brunello. Back home, Petrini sent a scathing letter of protest to the festival’s organizers, explaining that if in the Langhe they had passed off Nebbiolo for Barolo, they would have been lapidated with insults in the public square. The festival’s reply is an invitation to the 1983 conference in Montalcino: “Food and wine traditions in the House of the People”.

Not everyone knows that Montalcino played a leading role in the history of Slow Food, the most renowned international non-profit association committed to promoting “good, clean, and fair” food. In 1982, Carlo Petrini, the future founder of Slow Food, led a group of young social activists from the Arci Langhe association in Bra. Carlo was raised with a leftist political orientation and decided that focusing on a basic human need like food would be the best way to change the world. He went to Montalcino with his comrades to taste the Brunello that was all the rage. But at the political festival, Festa dell’Unità they attended, they were presented with bad food served with Rosso di Montalcino, instead of Brunello. Back home, Petrini sent a scathing letter of protest to the festival’s organizers, explaining that if in the Langhe they had passed off Nebbiolo for Barolo, they would have been lapidated with insults in the public square. The festival’s reply is an invitation to the 1983 conference in Montalcino: “Food and wine traditions in the House of the People”.

“Is there a battle to declare?” Petrini asks when he arrives with his letter at a crowded People’s House. “No, we’re here to reflect”, they reply. But once on stage, Carlo was put “on trial” by the women who had cooked in the Arci kitchens. However, he prevailed, and in his words, “And so with Brunello in the glasses, the real precursor to Slow Food, one of the first Circoli Arcigola was born”. Here, Petrini recalls the nationwide competition dedicated to the Arci groups’ kitchens, which rewarded quality gastronomy in Montalcino.

Only three years later, the tremendous momentum created by Arcigola led to the foundation of Slow Food in 1986. On November 3, 1987, the gastronomic publication “Gambero Rosso” dedicated their front page insert to the “Slow-food Manifesto”. And the International Slow Food movement was founded in Paris in 1989.

Today, the Slow Food movement involves millions of people and food communities in over 160 countries worldwide. Carlo Petrini has reached even China to spread his philosophy. And the UK news publication “The Guardian” sees him among the “50 men who could save the planet”.

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